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Pasadena Elite Fitness has earned a reputation for providing excellent personal training and fitness programs to the Los Angeles area. At their elite gym in Pasadena, dedicated personal trainers Dan and Danielle run group classes, personal training sessions, nutrition counseling, sport specific training, injury rehabilitation and weight loss regimens to help their clients achieve all their weight loss, health and fitness goals. They are proud to serve their community, including Eagle Rock, Glendale, Arcadia, Alhambra, La Crescenta, Rosemead, South Pasadena and surrounding areas since 2012.

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Contact Pasadena Elite Fitness for Fitness, Gym, Gyms, Lose Weight, Nutrition, Personal Trainer, Personal Training, Sports Training, Strength Training, and Weight Loss. Proudly supporting the areas of Alhambra, Arcadia, Eagle Rock, Glendale, La Cañada Flintridge, La Crescenta, Los Angeles, Pasadena, Rosemead, South Pasadena, and surrounding areas.

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Contact Pasadena Elite Fitness for Fitness in La Cañada Flintridge, Gym in La Cañada Flintridge, Gyms in La Cañada Flintridge, Lose Weight in La Cañada Flintridge, Nutrition in La Cañada Flintridge, Personal Trainer in La Cañada Flintridge, Personal Training in La Cañada Flintridge, Sports Training in La Cañada Flintridge, Strength Training in La Cañada Flintridge, Weight Loss in La Cañada Flintridge, and in surrounding areas.

Below is some general information about La Cañada Flintridge:

La Cañada Flintridge is a small and affluent city in Los Angeles County, California, United States whose population at the 2010 census was 20,246, down from 20,318 at the 2000 census. According to Forbes, as of 2010, La Cañada Flintridge ranks as the 143rd most expensive U.S. city to live in, with a median home price of $1,321,367.

The climate of La Cañada Flintridge is typical of a Southern California inland valley, with mild winters and hot summers. Spring often has hazy days, in contrast to the more persistently clear weather of fall. On average, the warmest month is August with high temperatures in the low 90s and lows in the low 60s. December and January are the coolest months with typical highs in the high 60s and lows in the mid-40s. Rainfall occurs mostly during winter, averaging about 22 inches annually. Rainfall is rare in summer. The moderating influence of the ocean (22 miles away) is limited due to the city’s location inland from the intervening Santa Monica Mountains, the Verdugo Mountains and the San Rafael Hills. Consequently, summers are generally hotter and winters often cooler than in coastal parts of metropolitan Los Angeles if winds are calm or blowing gently offshore. Occasional strong offshore winds, known as the Santa Ana winds, can bring particularly hot air in summer and fall as air from the desert plateaus crosses the mountains and descends, thus warming further by adiabatic heating. Summer and early fall temperatures are substantially cooler if the prevailing wind is persistently onshore. Occasionally during a winter storm, the upper elevations of the city may see trace amounts of snow. The small ski resorts Mountain High, Mount Baldy, and Mount Waterman are located about 30 miles to the northeast. In August 2009, the city came under threat by the Station Fire.

During the Spanish and Mexican eras, the area was known as Rancho La Cañada. Prior to the city’s incorporation in 1976, the area consisted of two distinct communities, La Cañada and Flintridge (the latter named after developer and United States Senator Frank P. Flint). Flintridge comprises the southern part of the city, covering the northern flank of the San Rafael Hills, but more generally including most areas south of Foothill Blvd. The eastern part of the city, even north of Foothill Blvd., was also originally considered Flintridge and is still home to the Flintridge Riding Club and Flintridge Preparatory School. Reference to the entire city is often shortened to just ‘La Cañada’ but seldom to just ‘Flintridge’. The full city name specifically does not have a hyphen in it, to illustrate unity between the communities that were once separately known as La Cañada and Flintridge. La Cañada Flintridge had the longest city name in California with 18 letters until the year 2000, when the title was ceded to Rancho Santa Margarita.

The La Cañada Unified School District serves most of the city and is often regarded as one of the top school districts in the state. On September 13, 2010, the California Department of Education announced that 2010 California Standards Tests (CSTs) results indicate that the La Cañada Unified School District earned the second highest Academic Performance Index (API) score in the state. The API reflects a district’s performance level, based on the results of statewide testing. The district has three public elementary schools that serve grades K-6: La Cañada Elementary, Palm Crest Elementary, and Paradise Canyon Elementary School. The public high school, La Cañada High School, which also serves as a middle school (grades 7-8), is a 1993 and 2004 Blue Ribbon School. La Cañada High School is currently ranked by the U.S. News & World Report as the 80th best high school in the country, 23rd best public high school in the country, 15th best high school in California, 5th best public high school in California, and best public high school in Southern California. A small portion of the city is served by the Glendale Unified School District, with La Cañada Flintridge students attending Mountain Avenue Elementary School (a 2005 Blue Ribbon School), Rosemont Middle School, Clark Magnet High School (a 2005 California Distinguished School), and Crescenta Valley High School (a 2005 California Distinguished School).

La Cañada Flintridge is southern terminus of the Angeles Crest Highway. The highway begins a two mile, 5% grade once it exits the San Gabriel Mountains, and terminates at the intersection of Foothill Boulevard. On September 5, 2008, a big rig carrying 78,000 pounds of onions lost its brakes on Angeles Crest Highway. To avoid a collision with the Hill Street CafŽ at the intersection of Foothill Boulevard, the rig turned towards a small driveway, sideswiped the CafŽ, crashed into a wall, a garbage bin, a tree and six vehicles before coming to rest in the parking lot. James Bines, 43, of Florida and his passenger Willy Robinson, had been hauling a full load of onions through the high desert area in the 18-wheeler. They traveled over Angeles Crest Highway because, Bines said, he had received directions from his global positioning system that the highway, State Route 2, was the most direct route from there to Los Angeles. On April 1, 2009, a similar incident occurred at roughly the same location. A car carrier transporting six cars southbound on the Angeles Crest Highway lost its brakes and, despite three runaway vehicle escape medians in the center islands, caused multiple vehicle accidents that resulted in two fatalities and 12 injuries, three of them critical. Angel Jorge Posca, 58, and his 12-year-old daughter Angelina, both of Palmdale, had just exited the eastbound Foothill Freeway at Angeles Crest Highway in their red Ford Escort and were starting to turn north on the highway to return to Palmdale when the semi-truck struck their vehicle. A bill that bans heavy trucks with three or more axles from driving on Angeles Crest highway was signed into law by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on August 6, 2009.

Source: La Cañada Flintridge on Wikipedia